Category NOTEWORTHY

SUGGESTIONS FOR TEACHING

Discussion: Question students briefly about the photographs to get them to focus on them and to introduce the topic. Then discuss the questions as a class. Write important vocabulary on the board, if time permits. The activity should require no more than a few minutes, just enough time to introduce the topic and arouse curiosity. Time: 4-5 minutes.

Vocabulary and Key Concepts: Have students quickly read through the sentences silently before they listen to the dictated sentences on the tape. This encourages students to invest in the exercise and may be done as homework. After they listen to the tape and fill in the blanks, quickly go over the spelling of each word, and discuss the meanings of words they ask about. Time: 10-12 minutes.

Predictions: Ask students to write three questions about the possible content of the lecture so that they make more of an investment in the lesson. If the example questions aren’t enough to get them started writ­ing their own questions, ask a "leading" question or two: Do you know how many people there are in the United States? (pause) How would you write the question to find out? Time: 8-10 minutes.

Notetaking Preparation: Go over the skill in Section D. l and have stu­dents practice the skill if appropriate. Try to move quickly, because they will practice the skill again during the lecture. Some skill exer­cises could also be assigned as homework, and those that require pre­lecture reading should be. Section D.2, which generally deals with the organization of the lecture, can be done as homework and checked in class to save time. Time: will vary depending on the particular skill in D. l and whether D.2 is done in class or at home.

Listening: The text calls for two listenings per lecture and additional listening outside of class for those students who fail to get at least 70 percent on the Accuracy Check. There is nothing magical in these numbers. Students stronger in listening comprehension may do well with fewer listenings from the beginning, and weaker students may need more, especially at the beginning of the course. Take into account the general level of the class when deciding how many whole-class lis­tenings to do. Try to maintain some pressure without pushing students to the frustration level. If possible, provide an opportunity for addi­tional listening outside class. Ideally, in one class period, you should get through at least the Prelistening Activities and the First Listening. Time: depends on the length of each lecture and the number of listen­ings done in class. (Actual lecture times vary from about 7 minutes to about 12 minutes.)

Accuracy Check: Do as quickly as is feasible. After students listen to and answer questions by referring to their notes, discuss only those an­swers that students disagree on. Try to raise their consciousness about why they missed an answer: Did they misunderstand the lecture? Were

their notes inaccurate? Or were they unable to locate the information in their notes? Sometimes students try to write down too much and miss relevant information. Sometimes they may simply be unable to locate information that they have in their notes. Recommendations for further listening and/or rewriting notes should be made at this time. Strive to complete and discuss the Accuracy Check by the end of the second class. Time: 12-15 minutes.

Oral Activities:

Review: Be sure that every student is involved in the activity by having individual students responsible for assigned sections of the lecture. (If students get their "assignments" the previous day, they can prepare at home and save class time.) You can vary the activity by having pairs or small groups of students prepare the same sec­tion together. Sometimes you may want individual students to re­port on their sections to just one other student; at other times, pairs or small groups can report to the whole class. Time: 10-25 minutes, depending on the complexity and length of the lecture and on the format you choose.

Transfer: Students in multinational classes will benefit from doing reports about their own countries on topics from the lectures. Stu­dents from the same country can work together to prepare the re­ports and present the information as a panel or assign one individ­ual to present it. In either case, students should prepare brief notes to speak from rather than write out the full report. Students in ho­mogeneous classes, such as those in EFL settings, will find class discussions more interesting and less duplicative of effort and in­formation. Time: will vary depending on the activity chosen, class size, and number of different national groups.

Collaboration: Appoint one member of the group as a leader, one as a recorder, and one as a reporter (when appropriate). Establish realistic time limits for completing the activity. Allow enough time for sharing upon completion of the task. Each group should receive peer feedback especially for summary writing and essay question answer writing. If time is short, assign fewer questions per group for the discussion and essay question answer writing. Time: depends on which skill is being practiced and the number of questions assigned.

Pursuing the Topic: If your schedule and course design allow, you may want to use our suggestions for further study of the topic. We have tried to include suggestions for further listening, reading, and speaking, but not every topic lends itself easily to all three. The suggestions are obviously not exhaustive, but they may remind you of works that you find more suitable for use with your students. Or the students them­selves can treat this activity as a research project in which they look for articles, stories, and books that they read and report to the class on. Students in an EFL setting, who will have difficulty finding informants

for interviews, may be able to locate one American who would be will­ing to be interviewed by the whole class. Time: will vary according to the material and activities chosen.

Follow-up Activities: Keep all follow-up activities as brief as possible. Besides providing feedback, they are also meant to remind students of the purpose of the just-completed task and to provide closure before moving to the next activity. Time: 2-3 minutes.

Unit Quiz Preparation: Our experience is that students retain informa­tion better and do better on quizzes when they anticipate the questions that will be asked. Use this section to help students anticipate quiz questions by having them review their notes and then write practice short-answer and essay exam questions. To save class time, students can review their notes at home by looking at the information in terms of main ideas and details that support the main ideas within each ma­jor subtopic. In class, small groups should then be ready to write short – answer questions that focus more on the details of the lecture as well as essay exam questions that focus more on the main ideas, albeit with support from details.

Students may well benefit from a reminder about correct question form: question word/auxiliary/subject/verb, in most cases. You may also want to walk around and give some guidance as students work, especially in the first units, to make sure that students understand their task. It is probably advisable to tell them that the quiz you even­tually give will not derive directly from their questions,- at the same time, if their notes are accurate and well-organized, they will have asked many of the same questions that the authors provide in the unit quizzes. Use the follow-up as a chance for students to evaluate their comprehension/retention of the lecture. Discuss their short-answer questions; use the better ones as review. Discuss their essay ques­tions; choose one or two for written follow-up if desired. Time: 8-10 minutes per chapter.

Unit Quizzes (Available on the Heinle Listening and Notetaking Web site http://notetaking. heinle. com: The primary purposes of the quizzes are to build motivation to take good notes and to simulate a college ex­perience. In a college class, students take notes that they later use to study from to prepare for tests. The time interval can be rather short, or it can be quite long—several weeks, for example.

We suggest giving a quiz on each unit. Assign point values to each question. Short-answer questions obviously earn fewer points than es­say questions, and you may want to weight more difficult questions with additional points. On a 25-point scale, the short-answer questions could count a total of 10 points and the essay questions, if both are as­signed, a total of 15 points.

We suggest that you let students know how much each question is worth and how much time they should devote to each portion of the quiz. If the class has studied all three chapters in a unit, you will have

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Multiculturalism

I. PRELISTENING______________________

B. Vocabulary and Key Concepts

1. skeptically/homogeneous

2. deny/impact

3. melting/metaphor

4. alloy/myth

5. excluded/discrimination

6. viewed/prejudice

7. mosaic/autonomous

8. Intermarriage/adoption

9. implied/exception

10. inherit/absorb

11. assimilation/generation

12. fragmentation/proponents

13. dominant/reflects

14. Opponents/Latinos

D. Notetaking Preparation

2. Rhetorical Cues

a. however,- on the other hand

b. In fact

c. For instance

d. however; nevertheless

e. Rather; Instead

f. On the other hand; However; Nevertheless

g. furthermore; also

II – LISTENING___________________________________ ‘

A. First Listening

Major Subtopics

ST1 the monoculturalist view ST2 the multiculturalist view ST3 the pluralistic view

A. Accuracy Check

1. No

2. harder

3. the monoculturalist view

4. African, Asian, and Native Americans as well as each newly ar­rived group

5. the patchwork quilt

6. No

7. 17%

8. We inherit, absorb, and choose it.

9. fragmentation or destruction of U. S. culture 10. open to change

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The American Character

Family in the United States

Assign one group member to write down the questions; all members will help plan and compose the questions. For the lecture on the fam­ily, write five short-answer questions that can be answered with a few words or sentences. In addition, write two essay questions; word the essay questions so that they can easily be turned into topic sentences.

Short-Answer Questions

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Essay Questions

1. ________

2.

Follow-up: Write your questions on the board to discuss as a class.

Written follow-up: Prepare for the quiz by writing answers to the questions your class has proposed. You have abbreviations in your notes, but do not use abbreviations other than standard ones like U. S. in your answers.

Chapter 5 Religion

Assign one group member to write down the questions; all members will help plan and compose the questions. For the lecture on religion, write five short-answer questions that can be answered with a few words or a maximum of two sentences. In addition, write two essay questions; word the essay questions so that they can easily be turned into topic sentences.

Short-Answer Questions

1. _________________________________________________________

2.

3.

4.

5.

Essay Questions

1. ___________

2.

Follow-up: Write your questions on the board to discuss as a class.

Written follow-up: Prepare for the quiz by writing answers to the questions your class has proposed. You may have abbreviations in your notes, but do not use abbreviations other than standard ones like U. S. in your answers.

UNIT QUIZ PREPARATION 65

Chapter 6 Passages: Birth, Marriage, and Death

Assign one group member to write down the questions; all members will help plan and compose the questions. For the lecture on passages, write five short-answer questions that can be answered with a few words or sentences. In addition, write two essay questions,- word the questions so that they can easily be turned into topic sentences.

Short-Answer Questions

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Essay Questions

1.

2.

Follow-up: Write your questions on the board to discuss as a class.

Written follow-up: Prepare for the quiz by writing answers to the questions your class has proposed. You may have abbreviations in your notes, but do not use abbreviations other than standard ones like U. S. in your answers.

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. Common Law and the Jury System

I. PRELISTENING

A. Discussion

Discuss the following questions with your classmates:

• Have you seen scenes of American courtrooms in movies or on TV?

• Do you think they realistically depict what happens in courtrooms?

• How are courtrooms different in your country?

Q B. Vocabulary and Key Concepts

Read through the sentences, trying to imagine which words would fit in the blanks. Then listen to a dictation of the full sentences, and write the missing words in the blanks.

1. The average person in the legal profession would probably say it’s

better to let a dozen_________________________ people go free

than to punish one innocent person__________________________

2. The guiding principle for the U. S. legal system is that an

accused person is_________________________

3. Under civil law the judge consults a complex

________________________ to decide whether the defendant is

guilty and, if so, what sentence to give.

4. Under_________________________________________________

the judge considers the__________________________ set by other

court decisions.

5. The jury hears_________________________ in either civil or crim­inal trials and reaches a_____________________________

6. A civil trial is one that deals with disputes between

_________________________________________________ , often

involving contracts or property rights.

7. In a civil trial, the jury decides which side is right and how much money should be paid in________________________________________ and

8. For a jury to convict a person in a criminal case, they must believe the person guilty_________________________________________

9. A person’s liberty and even life can be taken away if he or she is, that is, found guilty, of a crime.

10. Some of a judge’s responsibilities are excluding

________________________ remarks and questions by lawyers

and witnesses and deciding what kind of_____________________

is_________________________

11. If the required number of jurors cannot agree on a decision, it is

called a_________________________ jury, and the law requires a

new trial.

12. What happens in plea bargaining is that the accused _____ to a

Follow-up: Check the spelling of the dictated words with your teacher. Discuss the meanings of these words and any other unfamiliar words in the sentences.

C. Predictions

Using the photograph and the vocabulary exercise as a starting point, write three questions that you think will be answered in the lecture.

Example: • How many people are on a jury?

1. ________________________________________________________

Follow-up: After you have written your questions, share them with your teacher and your classmates.

D. Notetaking Preparation

1. Prelecture Reading

Before listening to a rather difficult lecture on the U. S. legal system, read a related passage dealing with precedents and surrogate mother­hood, and then answer the comprehension questions that follow. Although somewhat difficult, the reading and the questions will prepare you for the lecture you will hear later.

The Baby M Case

The Baby M case became a controversial legal case in the United States in 1988. At issue were Baby M’s custody and the validity of a contract. The contract provided that a woman, the surrogate mother, would have a baby for an infertile couple by artificial insemination of the husband’s sperm and would receive payment for this service. Cer­tainly, Baby M was not the first baby born to a surrogate mother, but in this case the surrogate mother, Mary Beth Whitehead-Gould, changed her mind after the baby was born and did not want to give the baby up, as she had agreed to do in the contract. The Sterns, the couple who had contracted for the baby, insisted that Ms. Whitehead – Gould fulfill the terms of the contract, and they took her to court. The New Jersey Supreme Court ruled that this type of contract was against public policy (the good of the general public) and, therefore, could not be enforced. (However, the court did award custody of the baby to the biological father. The mother, Ms. Whitehead-Gould, was awarded limited visitation rights.) This particular ruling was very important because there had been no previous court decision of this type at the level of a state supreme court. Therefore, this decision establishes a precedent for other states when they have to deal with the issue of surrogacy.

Questions:

a. Are Baby M’s natural mother and father married to each other?

b. Who wanted to break the contract, Mary Beth Whitehead-Gould or the Sterns?

c. In this reading, precedent most nearly means

1. a reason not to do something

2. a decision used as a standard

3. proof of innocence

4. proof of guilt

d. Was there a precedent for judging surrogacy contracts before the Baby M case?

e. In what sense will the Baby M case serve as a precedent in the future?

Follow-up: Discuss your answers with your teacher before you continue.

2. Courtroom Language

Look at the following illustration of a typical courtroom scene. Work with a partner to answer the following questions.

a.
Who keeps a written record of what is said in court?

b. Who ensures that the trial is conducted according to the law?

c. Who is a person who has knowledge of the case and is called to testify in court?

d. Who deliberates on the facts of the case and delivers a verdict (decision)?

e. Who has custody of prisoners and maintains order in the court?

f. Who is the person against whom the court action has been taken?

g. Who initiates court action against the defendant?

h. Who takes care of records involved in the court case?

Follow-up: Check your answers with your teacher.

И, LISTENING

!J A. First Listening

The lecturer begins with a rather long introduction in which she attempts to provide some background to a rather technical discussion of the U. S. legal system, which is based on common law. She then goes on to discuss the jury system and, finally, plea bargaining. It is not necessary to take notes until she begins to compare common law to civil law. Use the notetaking skills that you have practiced to make a set of meaningful and usable notes.

NOTES

Follow-up: Check your subtopics with your teacher. How did you organize your notes? Yours may be different from another student’s. What is important is that your notes should reflect the basic organiza­tion and information of the lecture.

Q В. Further Listening

While listening again, write down necessary relevant details below the main subtopics to which they belong.

Follow-up: Check your notes. If you missed important information or have doubts about your notes, (1) verify them by asking a classmate questions to fill the gaps in your notes or (2) listen to the lecture a third time. When verifying your notes with a classmate, do not show each other your notes; ask specific questions to get the information you need.

Examples: • What is the difference between common law and civil

law? Do you have that in your notes?

• I don’t have anything in my notes about what a judge does. Do you have it in your notes?

This is also a good time to check to see if the lecturer answered your Predictions questions about the lecture.

Ill – POSTLISTENING________________________________________________

Q A. Accuracy Check

Listen to the following questions, and write short answers. You will hear each question one time only.

1. _________________________________________________________

2.___________________________________________________

3. ________________________________________________________

4. ________________________________________________________

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10. _________________________________________________________________

Follow-up: Check your answers with your teacher. If your score is less than 70 percent, you may need to listen to the lecture again or rewrite your notes so that you can understand and use them later.

В. Oral Activities

1. Review

In small groups, discuss your notes, section by section, to be sure that all members have a complete set of notes for each subsection. At the end of this activity, your instructor will ask various class members to reproduce sections of the lecture for the whole class to listen to. At that time, check what you hear against your notes. If you don’t under­stand or you disagree with what you hear, wait until the speaker finishes. Then bring your notes into agreement by seeking clarification, as follows:

• Would you please repeat what you said about a written code of laws?

• Excuse me, but you didn’t mention plea bargaining. I think it’s important.

2. Transfer

If your class is multinational, prepare a short oral report about the legal system of your country, comparing and contrasting it to the legal sys­tem of the United States. Work with other students from your country.

If your classmates are all from your country, discuss the similari­ties and differences as a class.

C. Collaboration: Discussion

Discuss these questions in small groups. Appoint one person to report your group’s responses for each question to the class.

1. Which system do you think results in more convictions, or guilty verdicts, and why: civil law as practiced in Europe or common law as practiced in Great Britain and the United States?

2. Compare the advantages of having a judge decide a case without a jury to the advantages of having a jury decide a case.

3. Which principle of law do you think is fairer, "innocent until proven guilty" or "guilty until proven innocent"? Why?

D. Pursuing the Topic

The following are recommended for a closer look at the justice system in the United States:

Books/Periodicals/Internet

Posner, Richard A. "Juries on Trial." Commentary, March 1995, pp. 49-53.

Posner discusses criticism of the American jury system by experts who claim that the system is too easy on the defendants in crimi­nal cases and too sympathetic to plaintiffs in civil cases. Recent books suggest that the jury system is likely to end in civil cases. www. uscourts. gov

Explore this Web site to find out more about the judicial branch of the U. S. government. www. crimelibrarv. com

This Web site contains a wealth of information about notorious and highly publicized crimes and criminals.

Films/Videos

The Verdict, Sidney Lumet, director; 129 minutes, R.

This film depicts courtroom drama as a down-and-out Boston lawyer takes on a medical malpractice suit.

Reversal of Fortune, Barbet Schroeder, director; 120 minutes, R.

A Harvard law professor and lawyer attempts to reverse the con­viction of a man found guilty of the attempted murder of his wife in this film, which is based on a true story.

Field Trip

If you are studying in the United States, it may be possible for your instructor to make arrangements for your class to visit a local court­house, where you can watch the proceedings. Virtually all courtroom proceedings are open to the public.

Now that you have completed the chapters in this unit, your teacher may want you to take a quiz. Your teacher will tell you whether or not you can use your notes to answer the questions on the quiz. If you can use your notes, review them before taking the quiz so that you can anticipate the questions and know where to find the answers. If you cannot use your notes, study them carefully before you take the quiz, concentrating on organizing the information into main ideas and details that support these main ideas.

Work in small groups to help each other anticipate the questions your teacher will ask. Before breaking up into groups, review your notes and highlight important, noteworthy points. After reviewing your notes, break up into groups. Discuss and write specific short – answer questions and more general essay questions. (For guidelines in writing questions, see the Unit Quiz Directions at the end of Unit 1.)

Write your group’s questions on the following pages.

UNIT QUIZ DIRECTIONS 165

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The Population

A. Discussion

Discuss the following questions with your classmates:

• Do these pictures match your idea of the makeup of the U. S. population?

• Do you think the pictures reflect the racial diversity of the coun­try accurately?

• Do you think there are more old people or young people in the population?

• Do you think more people live in the East or in the West of the country?

Q B. Vocabulary and Key Concepts

Read through the sentences, trying to imagine which words would fit in the blanks. Then listen to a dictation of the full sentences, and write the missing words in the blanks.

1. Most countries take a__________________ every ten years or so

in order to count the people and to know where they are living.

2. A country with a growing population is a country that is becom­ing more.

3. A person’s_________________ is partly determined by skin color

and type of hair as well as other physical characteristics.

4. The majority of the U. S. population is of European_____________ .

5. The_____________________________________ of a country’s

population gives information about where the people are living.

6. The total population of the United States is___________________

_____________________________________ many different kinds

of people.

7. In other words, the population__________________ people of

different races and ages.

8. The average age of the U. S. population, which is a

__________________ large one, has been getting________________

higher recently.

9. areas are more___________________

populated than rural areas. That is, they have more people per square mile.

10. The use of antibiotics has greatly___________________ the

_____________________________________ throughout much of

the world.

11. A country whose_____________________________________

is higher than its death rate will have an__________________

population.

12. On the average, women have a higher_________________

__________________ than men do.

Follow-up: Check the spelling of the dictated words with your teacher.

Discuss the meanings of these words and any other unfamiliar words

in the sentences.

C. Predictions

Using the photographs and the vocabulary exercise as a starting point,

write three questions that you think will be answered in the lecture.

Examples: • Is the number of minorities increasing or decreasing?

• Why is the average age of the U. S. population increasing?

1. _

2.

3.

Follow-up: After you have written your questions, share them with your teacher and your classmates.

Q D. Notetaking Preparation

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