Category Life in society

INTERVIEW WITH CAROL: Problems with TV News

Here are some words and phrases from the interview with Carol printed in bold and given in the context in which you will hear them. They are followed by definitions.

The news is based on what’s going to keep people tuned in: watching TV

People are interested in plastic surgery or celebrities: medical surgery to improve your physical appearance / famous people

Find out how this woman lost weight: became thinner It’s shallow: without serious meaning

There are these people doing voice-overs: speaking “off-cantera” about what the viewer is watching

It’s equating those types of information: giving equal value to

Like a sitcom: TV series in which the same characters appear week after week (abbreviation for "situation comedy")

It’s like instant gratification: immediate satisfaction

TV news has to be reported by news anchors who are physically attractive: the main news reporters on TV

Do you think newspapers give you better coverage?: reporting I know I’m being sucked in!: tricked into watching

^ ANSWERING MULTIPLE-CHOICE QUESTIONS

1 Read the questions below before you listen to the interview with Carol.

1

Carol

According to Carol, news on TV a is mostly about health issues, b is mostly international.

c is mostly entertainment.

2 In Carol’s opinion, the evening news a is boring to most people.

b tricks people into watching, c is an important source of information.

3 Carol thinks that political problems

a don’t get reported in the way they should be reported, b are not really interesting for most people, c are presented well by TV reporters.

4 Carol believes that most people

a are very interested in war and politics, b want information quickly, c don’t watch the news.

5 Carol says that if TV news anchors are not physically attractive, a people will not watch TV news.

b viewers will complain, c viewers will change channels.

6 According to Carol, newspapers

a have a wider audience than TV. b can be read quickly, c have the same problems as TV.

7 Carol feels that news on the Internet a is worse than the TV.

b is hai’d to find, c is too general.

8 Carol

a ahnost never watches the news on TV. b watches TV news even though she doesn’t think it’s good, c avoids the mass media.

2 Now listen and circle the one correct answer for each question.

3

► PLAY

Work with a partner and discuss your answers. Do you agree with Carol?

INTERVIEW WITH SHARI AND FRANK: Reading the newspapers

Here are some words and phrases from the interview with Shari and Frank printed in bold and given in the context in which you will hear them. They are followed by definitions.

The news is really depressing: unhappy and without hope

It’s a prestige thing to cover the international news: something done to look important The human interest stories can be really uplifting: positive, inspirational It was shocking that the judicial system had failed: legal

I read the main stories, especially the scandals: shocking stories about people who have committed crimes or immoral acts

You have to take it with a grain of salt: not believe all of it

It’s a lot of half-truths: stories that are partly true and partly false

It’s really biased: presented from only one point of view, one-sided, not objective,

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INTERVIEW WITH HENRY: Living with teenagers

Here are some words and phrases from the interview w ith Henry printed in bold and given in the context in which you will hear them. They are followed by definitions.

Adolescence is the time when the pressure begins to shift: the time between childhood and adulthood / move or change comes into full bloom at about thirteen, fourteen: becomes fully developed You can tell at a glance: with a quick look

with the hope that the fad would have passed: a new fashion that is suddenly popular

Where w’ould you draw the line: place a limit on what is permitted

They can be talking online: on the Internet

Should you be trying to monitor it: watch it carefully

My kids are into video games: have an important interest in

О LISTENING FOR MAIN IDEAS

V____________________ У

Henry

Informal interviews and conversations are less organized than lectures or presentations. So, when you want to understand the main ideas, you have to think back over the whole interview or conversation and try to figure out what the people were trying to express.

1

In this interview’ Henry’ gives advice about how to deal with teenage children. Before you listen, read the following advice that is commonly given to parents on this subject.

Advice to Parents on How to Deal with Teenage Children

Be a good role model. Show them how’ to behave well by behaving well yourself.

Let them make their own decisions about fashion when they are ready. Monitor their behavior.

Give them freedom to experiment and have fun, as long as their behavior is safe and legal.

Set clear limits. Be clear about what they can and cannot do.

Listen to the w’av you talk to them. Try to avoid the annoying language that your own parents used with you.

► PLAY

Now listen. Place a check (✓) next to the main ideas that Henry’ discusses from the list above.

3 Discuss the following questions with a partner.

1 Do you agree with Henry ’s advice?

2 Look back at your answers to step 1 of "Sharing Your Opinion,” on page 19. Were your predictions about what Henry would let his sons do correct?

4 Another main idea that Henry talks about is the importance of peer groups. Read the two statements below and then discuss the questions that follow with a partner.

• As you get older, your friends become less important to you and your family becomes more important.

• As you get older, vour family becomes less important to you and your friends become more important.

1 Which statement expresses Henry ’s point of view?

2 Which statement do you agree with more? Why?

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NOTE TAKING: USING SYMBOLS AND ABBREVIATIONS

When you are taking notes during a lecture, you have to write down a lot oi’ information very quickly. Instead of writing out each word separately, you should develop the habit of using symbols and abbreviations.

You may want to change some of the symbols and abbreviations below to ones that are easier for you to remember and use. You will probably also want to invent some of your own, depending on the content of the lecture you are attending. When you invent symbols and abbreviations, it is important to review your notes as soon as possible after the lecture while their meanings are still fresh in your mind.

Symbols

Here are some symbols that are commonly used in English. Many of them come from the field of mathematics.

&

(and)

=

(is the same as, means, equals)

. .

(and so on, etc.)

*

(is different from, doesn’t mean)

@

(at)

<

(is less than)

Д

(therefore)

>

(is more than)

+

(plus, in addition to)

и

(ditto, as said before, similarly)

#

(number)

(causes, leads to, results in)

$

(dollars)

%

(percent)

Abbreviations

In addition to using symbols, good note takers abbreviate long words or words that are frequently used. Here are a few standard abbreviations that are commonly used in English. Notice that some are based on Latin words.

Ex. or e. g. w/ etc. A. M. P. M. gov’t ed. Prof.

Dr.

usu.

(for example; "e. g.” is from the Latin exempli gratia) (with)

(and other similar things, from the Latin etcetera) (before noon, from the Latin ante meridiem)

(after noon, from the Latin post meridiem) (government)

(education)

(Professor)

(Doctor)

(usually)

Pro and Con

pro (for, a Latin prefix meaning "in favor of”) con (against, an abbreviation of the Latin contra)

When taking notes, these tw»o words are useful. Many texts and lecturers talk about arguments for or against something, or the advantages and disadvantages of something. In such cases, it is easy to simply use the heading pro for arguments in favor of something or its advantages, and the heading con for arguments against something or its disadvantages. (The terms may be used in the plural as well: pros and cons.) It is also common for people to use these terms in conversation.

1 Study the symbols and abbreviations in the column on the left. Match them with their definitions in the column on the right. You might want to use some of these symbols and abbreviations in your notes for the lecture in this chapter.

1

в

a

single-sex education

2

9

b

coeducation, coeducational

3

ed

c

boy

4

ben(s)

d

different

5

s-s ed.

e

against, disadvantage

6

—►

f

opportunities

7

pro

Or

О

recommend

8

opps

h

and

9

. . .

І

benefit(s)

10

coed

j

girl

11

diff

к

for, in favor of

12

rec.

1

education, educational

13

&

m

causes, leads to, results in

14

con

n

and so on, etc.

2

3

Compare your answers with a partner.

► PLAY

Now listen to an excerpt from the lecture. Take notes as you listen, using symbols and abbreviations. Use your notes to tell your partner what you heard. Did you gather the same information?

LECTURE, PART ONE: Disadvantages and Advantages of Single-Sex Education for Girls

GUESSING VOCABULARY FROM CONTEXT

1 The following items contain important vocabulary from Part One of the lecture. Work with a partner. Using the context and your knowledge of related words, take turns trying to guess the meanings of the words in bold.

1 I’m often asked to defend single-sex education.

___ 2 as if girls’ schools were on trial

3 goes against the aims and the goals of feminists

4 Single-sex schools do not provide a smooth transition into the adult world.

5 Single-sex education values girls.

6 It values girls’ unique qualities.

___ 7 It helps girls develop self-confidence.

2 Work with your partner. Match the vocabulary terms with their definitions by writing the letter of each definition below in the blank next to the sentence or phrase containing the correct term in step 1. Check your answers in a dictionary if necessary.

a unusual, special b easy way

c the feeling that you can manage any situation d being questioned in a court of law e people who support womens rights f encourages and supports g explain why I am in favor of

NOTE TAKING: USING SYMBOLS AND ABBREVIATIONS

1 Look at these notes on Part One of the lecture. Think about what kind of

information might belong in the blanks. Notice that these notes are formatted in columns. The Cons (disadvantages, reasons against) arc in the first (left) column because these are the first aspects of the topic that Dr. Frosch presents. The Pros (advantages, reasons in favor of) are in the second (right) column. Putting your notes in columns labeled Pros and Cons is often an effective way to organize notes if a lecture is an argument for or against something, which this lecture is.

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Part Ove>: ViQdvantagcA ard АоРаи’Ь^? of Sin^Ie–Se-x Pdvoation for бяігі?

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Pro? (pr. ft pro?-? cd)

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► PLAY

Now listen to ParL One of the lecture. Take notes on your own paper. Remember to use symbols and abbreviations.

3 I Use vour own notes to complete the notes in step 1.

4 ! Compare your completed notes for step 1 with a partner.

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